Tuesday, 7 August 2012

Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild?

I have recently been asked whether I belong to a traditional quilt guild since traditional quilt guilds are wondering why the "modern" quilters are staying away and I thought I would ask you a few questions to see whether we can come up with any answers.  And so, if you have the time, I would love to know:

1.   Would you class yourself more as a traditional quilter or a modern quilter (or somewhere in between or a mixture of both)?

2.   Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild?

3.   If yes, what has been your experience in the guild?

4.   If not, why not?

5.   What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds?

6.   Do you belong to a modern quilt guild?

7.   If yes, what as been your experience in the guild?

8.   If not, why not?

9.   What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds?

10.  Is there anything else you would like to add?

Don't worry about following the numbering on the questions, just let me know what your experience and impressions have been.  Thank you, Lynne

92 comments:

  1. Without a blow by blow, I consider myself a "mix." In the past, I belonged to a Traditional guild - no experiences worth noting. (Except that I did not really care for the "business" portion...)

    I belong to a Modern guild, but I don't participate...

    For myself, I am getting what I got out of a guild in flickr & on blogs - visual stimulation...

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  2. I'm with Calico Cat - the business portion is a tad annoying - or was for me with the traditional guild I tried. Only other issue is that many of the other members for the one close to me had some veterans, some in their 80's which is awesome - but they weren't into solids, newer fabrics, creating their own blocks. There is no modern guild by me and it's tough finding like-minded in my area so I do flickr/blogs too.

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  3. I quilt whatever catches my eye, but I lean toward little 'm' modern for the most part.

    I belong to a well established (1979?), mostly very traditional guild. I joined about 7 months ago.

    So far, I’ve found it very welcoming in general. In fact, I’ve had a lot of support from them, including them pushing me (in a friendly way!) to become VP for our year starting in Sept. (which automatically matriculates to President the following year).

    I was very hesitant to join at first. I’m the youngest member by at least 10 years, on average probably closer to 30 years. I’d heard rumors of it being very clique-y (which have some merit). But, it’s a large group, and there are plenty of welcoming members. I find them far more welcoming of my quilts than a monthly meetup I go to at a local shop. Most of the members there were like "well, that’s different" to my most recent show and tell.

    Before joining the traditional guild, Thomas Knauer and I tried to get a Modern Guild going in our city, but we never got the momentum. I’m not sure what is happening with it. I would love for it to pick back up (there’s nothing wrong with belonging to two guilds, as far as I see it).

    I have mixed opinions about modern guilds, though (I guess in the same way I have them about traditional ones). I’m concerned that a lot of them focus on the modern with little-to-no respect for traditional—and ultimately, I do find myself interested in more traditional things in addition to modern. And, sometimes it feels like I’m seeing the same thing over and over again with modern quilts from modern guild quilters.

    Ultimately, I just want a place to learn all I can about technique—and that doesn’t necessarily require a definition of modern or traditional. And somewhere to see what other people are doing and show off my own stuff. I don’t know that there’s a label required for that, so long as everyone is welcoming to whatever style you want to show.

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  4. The quilt shows I have been to locally give the overwhelming impression that beige, batik or 'art' quilts are the only way to go, all of which I really do not like. There is a quilting group in the village, and I am guessing all the ladies are in their retired years.
    I don't think I have time for a regular outing, so I haven't searched out whether there is anything more modern locally, but I suspect not.
    I am dead jealous of the London MQG, although the word 'Guild' does have frumpy connotations in my head!

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  5. I currently belong to a traditional and 2 modern quilt guilds. The traditional was all that was available at the time. Then I found a modern one 1.5 hours away and then we started are own just down the road from me. Im letting the traditional lapse. I never felt like I fit, I enjoyed some of the meetings, workshops were never scheduled when I could attend, the bees were all filled and it seemed cliquish. But Im staying in the two Modern ones for now. The first one (Quilt Dads BTW) fits me so well! It is in a store I used to shop in when I first started quilting, and the people fit. They swap and blog and we have fun and talk to each other with out judgement. I think being a modern quilter is mostly about allowing everyone to succeed and not judging each other. When I entered a quilt in the traditional quilt show they did not get it. I first learned to quilt 20 years ago when there were lots of rules and some rule breakers. My local MQG is small and awesome. There are some traditionalists(infact the current traditional's president is a member)and newbies, and a few my age who have always been a little different.

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  6. I belong to 2 traditional guilds and enjoy them very much. I think I am a bit of a mix but edging closer to more modern. I have given away all my reproduction fabrics!
    I would love to join a Modern guild and there is one near me but it is in the city and at night, not going there no way! I would love to find something a little closer to home.
    I think there is room for everyone and everything out there today. I am excited to see the "younger" generation making it their own and am happy to follow along!

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  7. I belong to a MQG and love it. I have been quilting for many years and have done lots of kinds of quilts but I love the fresh, newer quilts the most. We are a small group and a wide range in ages. We all blog or blog stalk and work together to make quilts, bags, etc. and learn new techniques. I have never joined a guild before because I didn't have time when the kids were still home.

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  8. Quilts are quilts. I don't understand why the distinction between "traditional" and " modern".

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  9. 1. Would you class yourself more as a traditional quilter or a modern quilter (or somewhere in between or a mixture of both)?

    I'd say a traditional piecer who is drawn to the modern aesthetic and prefers modern fabrics in many cases. I would not necessarily classify myself as a modern quilter.

    2. Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild?

    I did last year and did not renew this year

    3. If yes, what has been your experience in the guild?
    I enjoyed some of the fun activities and giveaways but I had a hard time making it to meetings and felt like some of the demos of techniques did not suit my personal aesthetic.

    4. If not, why not?

    I didn't renew this year because I have four very young children. I had to pick one guild to pay to be a member of and attend faithfully and I am more attached to the Austin Modern Quilt Guild so I went with it.

    5. What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds?

    Wealth of knowledge amongst members, huge variety of project types, friendly and fun activities like quilt bingo and chocolate night.

    6. Do you belong to a modern quilt guild?

    Yes, I belong to the Austin Modern Quilt Guild

    7. If yes, what as been your experience in the guild?

    I acted as Co-President for a year and now happily relax as just another member with no responsibilities. It's a great group with an active facebook page where we all share inbetween meetings. I don't attend many happy hours or retreats as my current family life doesn't allow me to, but have been assured by many members that they add to the experience for them. I like the relaxed atmosphere, the show and tells featuring patterns and fabrics I love and the camraderie.

    8. If not, why not?
    n/a
    9. What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds?

    I worry that Modern Quilt Guilds are spending too much time worrying about the legitimacy of "modern" quilting as an art form and too much time trying to differentiate themselves from traditional quilting, which may hinder the growth of the quilters within the group, but I love the laid back atmosphere and acceptance of the Austin group.

    10. Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I think you can never have too many influences and mentors in any art form and it is never wise to narrow your mindset and avoid new experiences.

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  10. My tastes definitely lean toward the modern, though I don't mind traditional quilts as long as they're made with modern fabrics. Batiks and other similar fabrics are just not my cup of tea. I would really love to belong to a modern quilt guild, but the one for my area seems to have disappeared in the last year or so. I checked into it with The Modern Quilt Guild online, and they actually offered to give the leadership to me -- an exciting thought but not something I can add to my work load right now. The only other guild I've found in the area is a traditional one, which I was willing to try, but they only meet on a night when I have other commitments. So for now, I sew alone...sigh. That's why I'm so thankful for the online quilting community. It's a place where I can get a taste of the encouragement that I expect I would find in a guild.

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  11. I cannot speak much about traditional guilds other than my aunties both belong and their quilts are not my kind of quilts. I belong to a modern quilt guild that is friendly, casual and fun. Several of our members belong to a traditional guild which they appreciate for different reasons. My modern guild is hosting several workshops and sharing is great. So are door prizes. Getting to know other quilters in my area is nice after just knowing online quilters.

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  12. I belong to a quilt society in Ireland and have been in this group for well over 10 years. I've been very happy with it up till now, as it has a mixture of traditional & contemporary, young & old members and has a nice mix. Some of the older ladies (some in their 80's) are great fun and are more willing to try new techniques than some of the younger members. I'm one of the younger members in my local branch (I'm my 30's). Lately though, a very vocal, more established member has rejoined my local group and committee after being away for a number of years. This person seems has a bit of a problem about contemporary quilters, and keeps trying to gear all meetings, workshops etc. to beginners and traditional quilters, instead of having a mix of workshop types, skill levels etc. I think it's issues like these that are causing younger people to join modern quilt guilds instead of everyone being in the more established quilt guilds, which I think is a pity as we can all learn from each other.
    I do think the more traditional quilt guilds need to get more clued up on using blogs, flickr, swap groups etc. to get connected with younger members.
    I've just recently joined a Modern Quilting Guild - haven't done anything with the group yet but am looking forward to giving it a go.

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  13. I guess I would probably class myself as a modern quilter - although in truth I don't make big quilts very often. I don't belong to a guild - if there was a Modern Quilt Guild near to me then I might consider it but as my sewing time is rather limited and sporadic, I'm not sure it would really work for me. I would much prefer to be a member of something like your Kitchen Quilt Guild!
    R x

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  14. I don't see the need for 'segregation'. I can make a modern quilt using traditional fabrics, or a traditional quilt using modern fabrics. Whatever you call it, it's quilting, and like with everything else, tastes vary, trends come and go. A lot of what I see at the moment with the label 'modern' is actually retro and firmly based in the 1950s. It all comes around again and again. I wish all Guilds and Groups (and their members, whatever their ages) would embrace the diversity that quilting offers to everybody. I'm a member of The Quilter's Guild of the British Isles, the German Quilt Guild (Patchworkgilde), and a small local group that meets once a month. Membership to the two guilds is worth every penny (and Euro).

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  15. i have recently tried a traditional quilt group through my church and a new branch of the modern quilt guilds and i have to say hands down the modern one is for me. i felt like the modern guild's ladies were more like minded about what we enjoyed making and how we viewed the whole quilting experience.

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  16. Gabriele Latz, Heilbronn/Germany7 August 2012 at 14:59

    I'm a longtime Quilt Guild member to the German Patchworkgilde. I'm a member, because they offer an insurance for expositons that no other puplic company does. I'm working on traditional Quilts but at this time I changed my work to the modern part. I'm keen on modern quilting. There is no Modern Quilt guild nearby, what makes me disapointing. I like the Modern quilt Guild of the US and there is no day, if I don't look at it.

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  17. I belong to both a traditional guild (ten years) and a modern guild (almost 2 years). I consider myself a modern quilter. I have met some lovely people and made some good friends in my traditional guild. As a whole, though, they are not interested in the same kinds of quilts as I am. Members of my MQG totally "get" my kind of quilts. In addition, we are all online and read many of the same blogs and other social media so we have a shared experience that my traditional guild does not.

    My traditional guild is quite large and can offer classes with national and international teachers, a large quilt show, a biennial quilt conference and lots of other things that are more than worth the membership - and, of course, the great people. But my MQG is my quilting home.

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  18. Hey woman!
    I think I belong to a modern quilter with traditional skills. LOL if that makes sense? Sure, I press my seams open but it's not like I don't sew "modern". I put together my blocks traditionally. . . but my choices in fabric are not traditional at all!

    I do belong to a modern quilt guild. I like having a common hobby where we can get together once a month. We can chat, giggle, and sometimes sew. Also each month we learn something new (or at least try too)

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  19. 1. Would you class yourself more as a traditional quilter or a modern quilter (or somewhere in between or a mixture of both)? I consider myself a mix of both modern and traditional, as I love modern fabrics in traditional patterns.

    2. Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild? No.

    4. If not, why not? The wait list to join my local traditional guild is so long I wouldn't get my chance in my lifetime.

    5. What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds? I can't judge as I've never belonged to one, but I've heard they're kind of stuffy. I did go to one meeting years ago and everyone seemed really nice.

    6. Do you belong to a modern quilt guild? Yes.

    7. If yes, what as been your experience in the guild? So far, I love it! I just joined, and it enabled me to join their bee. I'm having so much fun! There are some definite modern quilters in the guild, but there also seem to be some traditionalists. Maybe they couldn't get into the traditional guild either? Also, it's small so far--and I like that.

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  20. I would say that I'm erring on the more modern side. I like traditional quilt patterns, but I tend to be drawn towards more modern stuff or towards modern variations of traditional quilting.

    I don't belong to any guilds two reasons: (1) I live in a big city and the guilds are far enough away to make taking part a problem. The closest would involve a 1 hour, 2 bus trip to get there, and an even longer trip to get back (less bus service after rush hour). (2) While regular meetings tend to be in the evening, a lot of other events seem to happen during the day on workdays. I assume this is because a lot of the members are stay at home parents or retired. Regardless of why, I don't have enough vacation to dedicate some of it to guild events.

    My impression of traditional and modern guilds is about the same: both are gathering places for quilters and could be great places to learn from more experienced quilters. I would likely veer towards a modern quilt guild simply because of my quilting preferences. Both have value, but while the internet can't replace them, it certainly be a reasonable alternative for those of us who can't make it to guild meetings. Both (at least where I live) need some younger or more social media savvy members to reach out and get more people involved. If either guild in my city had more of an online presence, I would happily engage with them online and maybe eventually find value in taking 2 hours of my evening to travel to a meeting on occasion (or, find someone to car pool with).

    Actually, now that I think about it, I'm not sure why there needs to be a delineation between modern and traditional quilting. Wouldn’t it be better and offer more learning opportunities if everyone just got together as quilters and accepted that everyone has different preferences? You could alternate between modern, traditional, etc. events, challenges, etc.

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  21. I consider myself a traditional quilter. On rare occasions, I venture away from that...but rarely. I belong to what would be considered a traditional guild. Having said that, we often have speakers that are more modern and many of our members step outside of the box occasionally. Even though that isn't the type of quilting I enjoy, I always learn something from them. Belonging to a guild is a good experience in that you have contact with like minded souls! The fun part of a guild is sharing our quilts with each other. The not-so-fun part is all the business that has to be taken care of.

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  22. I call myself a "moditionalist". I like the clean aesthetic of modern quilts, but I still like traditional as well, particularly when it comes to the quilting - I'll put feathers on everything! I'm a member of both a traditional and a modern guild (at one point I was in two traditional and 1 modern guilds)
    The traditional guild I belong to is very welcoming and open. Our business meeting is mandated to only be 30 minutes long. There is a great variety of skills ans techniques used by the members, and they hold excellent trunk shows and workshops.
    The modern guild is so fun - everyone has so much enthusiasm and energy - I always leave feeling so inspired. It is a younger group, some who have only just started quilting within the last year. It's very much a can do group. In show and tell, you will see a lot of traditional patterns interpreted in new ways - different layouts, colour, groupings.

    I thoroughly enjoy both my guilds!

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  23. I love both traditional and modern quilting. Didn't realize that there were two different kind of guilds. I belong to a traditional guild. I can show a traditional or modern quilts at the guild or quilt show. I guess I don't have an issue with my guild. People are quite friendly.

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  24. I would classify myself as modern. I appreciate traditional piecing, but have a modern color and design aesthetic. I belonged to a traditional quilt guild for a year. I found it unwelcoming and clique-y. My show and tell offerings were never appreciated and I got passive aggressive critiques a few times. As far as I could tell, most of the members didn't actually make much of anything themselves. When they did it was copies of quilts from books, down to the color scheme. I did find the level of programing to be quite high, but as a guild that was 30 years old and had over 300 members there was a lot of money to bring in speakers. The workshops were rarely to my taste, but it's good to step outside your comfort zone.

    My experience with the DSMMQG has been totally different. Everyone is welcoming and excited to see what others makes each month. So far we have mostly been having members do the presentations for budget reasons, but that has been interesting too. It's great to see what your fellow members can do. I'm planning on moving in the near future and I will give the traditional guild in my new city a chance, especially since I already know a few members through the Modern Quilt Guild. However, if I had to pick between programing of the traditional guild and welcoming members of the mqg, I'd pick the mqg any day.

    I find modern quilters to be a much more curious and interested lot than the traditional quilters. Modern quilters also seem to be more accepting of all styles. Art quilts and traditional blocks in brown tones might not be our thing, but we appreciate the work and technique that goes into them. I haven't found the opposite to be true.

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  25. Modern fabrics - simple patterns. I don't generally like "meetings", and there is a traditional quilt guild in my town (Cookeville, TN, USA) that I am not tempted to join. However, if there was a modern guild (closest is Franklin, TN), I would definitely join for the camaraderie of like-minded individuals. But like others have said, I get a ton of inspiration from blogs like yours! And I do meet at a church one Saturday a month to sew, mostly with traditional quilters, and I enjoy the fellowship even though I'm not always fond of their fabrics.

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  26. If forced to choose, I would say I lean more toward the modern...but I do love traditional designs too and one of my favorite quilts I've made is made from 1930 repro fabrics. I have yet to join the traditional guild in our area, mostly because I have met some of the women who run it and I have had a very lukewarm response to the quilts I am making (they frown and wonder why anyone would ever piece a back or they comment on the "brightness" of the fabrics or wonder why I chose not to put a border on the quilt). I don't feel like I would fit with this group. I've brought some of my quilts to show and tell at a BOM group and although everyone is polite, I can tell they don't "get it." I did join a modern quilt guild but it is over 3 hours from me, so I don't really see myself being able to participate much. I have connected with Flickr groups, blogs and recently Threadbias in order to fulfill my desire to connect with other quilters like myself.

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  27. My Mum is also a quilter and growing up the 2 guilds that she was a member of were 'Traditional' - I became a member of the 2nd Guild in my Teens and was the youngest by about 10-15 years. We have been talking about the difference between Guilds recently (since I joined the London MQG at its 2nd meeting) the Guilds are in New Zealand where there is a very high number of Quilt Guilds in relation to a small population, what is interesting about the Wellington Guild is that a lot of the members would now be classified as Modern Quilters and there hasn't been a need to establish a MQG. When I first moved to London I did look into joining the London Quilt Guild but it just wasn't convenient to attend a meeting on the other side of London in the middle of a work week. I think the main difference between a MQG and a Traditional Quilt Guild is that MQG'ers spend a lot of time getting inspiration and learning skills from blogs and many established quilters belong to traditional Guilds and are only just discovering the options available to them online. I also think a lot has to do with the ages of members - and reluctance on both sides, I think to younger people they seem a bit of a closed group. If I had the opportunity I would join as many Guilds as possible just to spend time with other Quilty people, the beauty of all Guilds is you can choose to participate (or not participate) at a level that suits you. And Show and Tell is a highlight wherever you are.

    I don't feel that I'm A Modern Quilter in the MQG definition nor do I feel I am a traditional quilter but I do use very traditional methods and sometimes fabrics - mainly because some of the fabric in my stash is around 15 years old. I do think it is a shame that there is a division.

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  28. I would say I am a traditional quilter. I started off taking classes in a quilt store but did not think I was good enough at quilting to join a guild. I was so silly. I have been a member of a traditonal guild for almost 10 years. I have been a memeber of a modern guild for almost one year. I would have joined the modern guild sooner but I needed my work to ease up a bit first. The two guilds I belong to are very different. My traditional guild is a formal meeting (with Roberts Rules of Order), we have guest speakers at most meetings, a library of quilt books, classes, bus trips and retreats are offered. We also have a quilt show every second year. My first meeting I was watching the show and tell section and had worked with one woman years earlier, I went over to say hi and now have a bunch of quilt friends. Being involved in the guild is the best way to meet people and get better at quilting at the same time. My modern guild is less formal, the business of the meeting still happens but in a very light hearted way. Laughter is very frequent. Acceptance was easier in this guild (however I had visited there before and already had friends who were members. The modern guild is younger as a guild and its members, but that is not to say that there are not young people in my tradtional guild. My modern guild uses a blog whereas my traditonal guild emails a link to the monthly newsletter that is posted on the guild website.
    I have made modern quilts but I struggle with improve piecing - it is very messy and I learned to do the cutting then the sewing. Sew then cut, then sew feels like it takes way longer. But I know that if I continue I will get a beeter grip on it.
    Love your blog!

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  29. I don't belong to a guild, mostly because they meet either at night or on the weekends and that is family time for me. I consider myself a mix, but hopefully, mostly modern. What I would really like is a group of friends that could meet once a month during the week.

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  30. 1. Would you class yourself more as a traditional quilter or a modern quilter (or somewhere in between or a mixture of both)?
    I would consider myself a traditional quilter. That said my applique, piecing, and quilting is all done by machine. I can and have done all by hand and prefer the speed of machine work.
    2. Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild?
    I do belong to a traditional guild.
    3. If yes, what has been your experience in the guild?
    My experience has been very positive. There are all techniques and skill levels represented and respected.
    4. If not, why not?
    5. What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds?
    I love them. As far as I can see all methods of quilting are represented and appreciated.
    6. Do you belong to a modern quilt guild?
    No.
    7. If yes, what as been your experience in the guild?
    8. If not, why not?
    I just plain don't see the need. I don't understand the need for a modern guild. I appreciate and have made modern quilts and so do the others in my guild. If you find yourself in a guild that doesn't, maybe the fault is that particular guide not all traditional guilds.
    9. What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds?
    To be honest, why limit yourself to one style of quilting. I enjoy seeing and learning about many skills. I think it is a mistake to ignore the past.
    10. Is there anything else you would like to add?
    I think it's sad that there is becoming such a separation on a skill that is all about sharing and community.

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  31. It's so coincidental that you should ask these questions now. Kristy Daum, founder of the St. Louis Modern Quilt Guild, will be the featured speaker at my traditional quilt guild's August meeting this Friday. Also, the quilt top that I most recently completed was a Modern Disappearing Nine Patch pattern that I found on Kristy's website. I'd consider myself primarily a traditional quilter who loves modern tools, modern shortcut techniques and modern fabrics. Although my guild is over 20 years old, it seems to embrace and accommodate all quilting styles.

    I joined the guild in 2004, after I had already made a few quilts. However, I never considered myself a quilter until after I joined the guild. Through this guild, I have learned so much and solidified my passion for quilting. Rarely, do I sew clothing anymore.

    In my opinion, modern quilt guilds can serve to encourage younger people to get into quilting. On the otherhand, I think it's important for modern quilters to understand the traditions. Younger people are beginning to join my guild as many of the older quilters are aging or dying. However, sometimes a traditional guild can get stuck into doing things the way that they have always done things--like mailing the newsletters and other communications in U.S. Mail, instead of using email, because many of the older members are not PC literate. Also, many of the older members can no longer lead on committees and board, but are unwilling to change, which can sometimes cause conflicts. Personally, I am very happy with my guild and have no interest in joining a modern guild. My guild is changing, with baby steps, with the changing times.

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  32. I'm probably more on the modern side of things. I'd love to visit the tradition guild near me, but they meet at 10 a.m. on Tuesdays, and I work full-time.

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  33. I used to belong to a traditional quilt guild. They have gotten a lot more into the "art quilt" realm. I quit going mostly because of the time. I joined a Modern Quilt Guild and the people are much more relaxed. They get that there is more than one way to do things. I make lots of quilts that I consider "traditional" but others have labeled them "modern". I just like making quilts and getting together with other quilters who like to have fun quilting. I like the "just try it" attitude of the modern quilters. When I have a bit more time I may join the traditional guild again.

    On a side note, I feel that a lot of modern quilters are new to quilting and don't know much about the history of quilting and antique quilts. There is a lot to learn there. I think that in general traditional quilters have been quilting longer and know more quilt history.

    I finished my first quilt in 1976 and I feel like I know what I want to do now. I just make quilts that I want to make and don't really worry about whether it is modern or traditional. For me quilting is more the process and I want to belong to a guild where people have a similar approach and like to try new/different things when designing and making quilts.

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  34. I consider myself somewhere in the middle of traditional and modern and art quilter. I like it all. I belong to one quilt guild and 2 friendship groups - one being a more traditional group and the other an art group. I love being part of the guild. Our guild is pretty good about encouraging all types of quilters, whether you're an art quilter, modern or traditional. I truly believe you get out of a guild what you put in. If you don't like the way the guild is handling something, let's say programs, then sign up to take over programs the next year. Because of this we have had a wide range of speakers and workshops. When I first joined the guild, I didn't like the newsletter so I signed up - I did newsletter for over 10 years, got our guild on facebook and a website/blog. People have to realize that a guild is a group of volunteers and they are what makes the guild succeed or fail. What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds? I'm not sure what the difference would be between a modern and traditional guild? Are they not all volunteers who get together to show and tell and learn? I don't really know why we need to separate but if they do, I'm okay with that. I think modern quilters are usually the younger quilters. I think the younger quilters could learn a lot from the older ones and vice versa. We oldsters need to open up to the new look, new techniques, but then again, there is something to be said about knowing the basics too, which the younger ones can learn from the traditional quilters.
    I know from experience that those who complain about their quilt guilds are also the ones who do nothing for the guild - they are not part of any committee or show up for any of the projects (workshops, opportunity ticket sales, boutiques and other fund raisers, they don't participate in block of the month, round robins, mysteries or challenges). That's what frustrated me the most when I was president of the guild. And when they said something to me I automatically would tell them that I will put your name on the committee for next year so they could run the committee how they want it.

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  35. I don't really class myself as either, I just make whatever takes my fancy at the time ;)

    I don't really have the time or money to commit to a guild, any spare time I have is normally close to midnight and not many guilds meet then! I find most of my inspiration and peers to talk to via twitter, Instagram and blogs. Having said that I have just started a needlecraft group. The reason I did this is I wanted a group where we could sew, knit, embroider or any other fabric related craft. I feel guilds a little too rigid, maybe it's just me?

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  36. I'm in a traditional quilt guild, but certainly one with a mix of experience levels and styles of quilting. It is a group of incredible women (we have no men in my chapter yet) who have shared and laughed with me along the way. They have supported me through the death of my younger brother, and the unexpected death of my dad. They are a real treasure in my life, and if I could no longer quilt I would still go, and would still be welcome. I'm a traditional quilter who is moving to the modern and art quilt genre. I would love to belong to a modern quilt guild, but do not have time to do both right now.

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  37. I'm a mixture -- more traditional than modern though. I do not belong to a guild of any kind and I doubt I every will. Deafness is the main reason.

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  38. I think I am leaning more toward modern quilting.

    I live in a large city and have gone to 2 different quilt guilds' meetings. Both were traditional guilds and I did not feel welcome at either place. I was the youngest by far with most of the ladies being older than my mother.

    I have not been to a modern guild meeting, although there is one in my city. I cannot make their meeting times.

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  39. Ooh great questions :) oh I'm a good mixture of both traditional where it all started for me back in e day, and modern as I get dragged into anew way of seeing things from the online community. Yes I belong to 2. Traditional groups, both the average age is geriatric, I'm the whippersnapper in the corner. However, just because some of them are the real twin set and pearls type doesn't mean ey are all old and frumpy. Most of em have seen it all before, and there's still a thing or two to be learned from them. Yes they frown a lot, but they come round :). I'd love to belong to a modern guild, I need to chat with Moira again to continue our conversation about an East Midlands one! But I consider the on line community much like that too :). At the end of the day we all make what pleases us as individuals, and over time our tastes change, or we just learn what we like more!

    The quilting world will continue to evolve and change with the people, designers and manufacturers that influence it. Modern is of our time, and will be different again at some stage :)

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  40. 1. Would you class yourself more as a traditional quilter or a modern quilter (or somewhere in between or a mixture of both)?

    I would probably say that I am a "mixture". . .I love traditional blocks and settings but like doing them with all kinds of fabrics. . .not just little prints.

    2. Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild?

    Yes. . .a group of friends started it over 10 years ago.

    3. If yes, what has been your experience in the guild?

    We started the guild because we didn't want to be "bogged" down with business meetings, rules, regulations. Our group was started so that there would be more time to visit; help others out with their projects, eat and just have fun.

    4. If not, why not?

    I've belonged to traditional guilds for most of my quilting life.

    5. What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds?

    A lot of them are "too full" of themselves and get hung up on rules --- that can take out the fun of working together.

    6. Do you belong to a modern quilt guild?

    No.

    7. If yes, what as been your experience in the guild?

    8. If not, why not?

    Actually, I don't see a difference between what is considered "modern" and what I do. However, I don't do "wonky" which is probably the only thing that I can identify as being "different". However, looking at old quilts even "wonky" is traditional.

    9. What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds?

    I don't have any impressions. . . . don't know of any modern quilt guilds in my area.

    10. Is there anything else you would like to add?

    In looking at Moda Bake Shop and other "modern" classified quilt blogs I don't understand why they think they are reinvented the wheel ---- their designs are basically things that have been done in the past.

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  41. Not a guild member, because I do not know of any, and do not know where I would find the time!
    Wish I could find one, and the time!

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  42. I'm both and I'm still trying to understand why it's all separated. Basically you have your blocks, applique, design, whatever, then you choose your modern or traditional fabric, or both (or vice versa). It's all quilting, which I have a passion for. And I appreciate the time and effort that goes into the quilts, whether they are made with batiks (which I don't care for) or modern fabric (which I love).

    Due to an intense family life, I belong to no guild and never have, and most likely never will, but have many friends that quilt. And I'm eager to read your synopsis of this friendly discussion.

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  43. 1. Would you class yourself more as a traditional quilter or a modern quilter (or somewhere in between or a mixture of both)?

    I would say leaning more toward the modern

    2. Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild?

    No

    3. If yes, what has been your experience in the guild?

    N/A

    4. If not, why not?

    The only one I know of is over near my gran's, and even her little old lady friends were getting annoyed with the other little old ladies and their rigid rules, so it didn't sound too appealing lol

    5. What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds?

    Over here, I guess populated with little old ladies! At the Scottish Quilt Show I've never yet seen more than 4 other people under about 50, which I find rather depressing, and most of them are definitely over 60

    6. Do you belong to a modern quilt guild?

    Yes

    7. If yes, what as been your experience in the guild?

    Well I run it, and, err, it's probably at best somewhat hippyish in its organisation. We're trying to get better though lol

    8. If not, why not?

    N/A

    9. What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds?

    I get the impression that US and Aussie MQGs are somewhat different to ones everywhere else, simply because they have the shops, the sponsorship, and more people 'in the know', hence I've been reading on the MQG board recently about people's big concerns over membership cards and websites, where my main concern is whether people will turn up lol

    10. Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Erm... nope

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  44. 1. these days a modern quilter
    2. Yes
    3. I belong to 2 - and they are a lovely friendly bunch, who wonder at my more 'free' approach to my latest projects
    4. -
    5. There are some who would be practically limbless without a pattern to rigidly follow, let alone a rotary cutter and ruler - I frightened some recently when we made the 'hourglass' block and I told them to put rulers away or better still not to bring them ....
    6. No
    7. I wish I had the opportunity to be in one and share the experience
    8. There is no MQG locally
    9. From some of the photos shared some are really embracing the 'movement' whilst some are more like an weak attempt at making something 'modern' but a little more than coin stack quilts and such
    10. Whilst some modern quilts look simple they are far from it when you really examine them and others are very deceptive in the complexity of what you see and are actually based on a simple concept - I think however a lot depends on your fabric stash - they can make or break a project as we all - traditional or modern quilter know.

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  45. I don't really think there is that much difference.

    I think of myself as a modern quilter because I am a modern woman. I am tech savvy and the net has been my quilt teacher. The stuff I have been most drawn to is the fabrics that are considered modern and I love improv piecing.

    I did think about joining a traditional guild but they had a 2 year waiting list near me. I then went to one of their shows and while I enjoyed it the overall feeling was that the members were white, middle class and late middle age or over. It didn't feel right to me.

    Then the London MQG started and it felt right for me. I think we are a great diverse group of different ages and backgrounds with a really open minded attitude. Well I think so anyway.

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  46. 1. I am a mix, but sometimes I feel very out of place in the 'modern' setting. I love florals!!! I am a Fig Tree girl. I don't like novelty fabrics. I do like clean lines and solids.
    2. I was for a year but it was overwhelming. Too much applique! They all knew each other and I couldn't break in. Guess I answered no. 3 as well.
    5. They can be kind of clique-y and for my local chapter they have a lot of day groups which are impossible to do.
    6. Yes, I am a member of a modern quilt guild. The people tend to be younger (more my age) and super nice!
    9. This isn't really something limited to modern guilds, but also the online community. It has been getting kind of samey-samey recently.

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  47. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  48. 1. Moving away from trad to mod.

    2. Yes - member of Quilters Guild of British Isles.

    3. I retain my membership because I know they do a lot for preservation of quilts and I think our quilting heritage is important. Locally our Area rep organises a coffee morning every month, she is enthusiastic (and supportive of my classes)but most members are VERY trad e.g. all looked very non plussed when I recently took along my Hexie quilt in mod fabrics, it fell on very stony ground. There are still quilt police around too.

    4. N/A

    5. I was going to start on about age but then I remembered how old I am - if people keep an open mind they can be receptive to new methods & fabrics.I think Shevvy made a good point in a recent blog post - if we want to see change we need to be entering our work into shows.

    6. Yes, altho I haven't been a very good attender, early days yet.

    7. Still finding our feet and purpose.

    8. N/A

    9. They seem to be intertwined with online quilting community - this in itself could alienate certain sections of the quilting population.

    10. I imagine that back in the 70s when quilting was in its infancy in the UK, quilters then would have described themselves as modern.They would all be ground breaking in their own way.There are so many talented and technically brilliant quilters in the UK and worldwide - room for all I would hope.

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  49. I belong to the Bay Area Modern QG and lean towards the more modern end of the spectrum butthink of myself as a "Free Range" quilter- I like some traditional quilts as well, but gravitate to more bright, modern fabrics. I have no experience with any other guild. The one I belong to is great- lots of creative energy, demos, advice, challenges, etc, etc. I love to see what others are doing and to share what I do. THere is quite an age spectrum in the group, which is wonderful. And also quite a skill spectrum.

    I love that there is so much on-line access to quilters who are also creative and energetic. It is almost like a virtual guild. I tend to gravitate toward the modern quilt blogs, but I can't say that I have spent much time looking for traditional blogs.

    I believe that many traditional quilt designs can be translated into so-called modern format simply by a change in fabric choices.

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  50. I consider myself a modern quilter, but with an interest in traditional skills and designs, so a mix I suppose.

    I don't belong to a traditional guild. I did recently think about visiting the one closest to me, but I don't feel that sure about whether I'd fit in. I suppose my view of it is that everyone is going to be older than me and quite traditional - I may be completely wrong.

    I would love to join a modern quilt guild, but don't know of any near me. In fact, I have been toying with the idea of trying to get one started for Somerset/Devon area. I think the main differences I would see between traditional and modern guilds would be that modern guilds are driven a lot by what's out there on the Internet and blogland - I know when I do talk to people local to me who quilt, none of them buy fabric on the internet, let alone read blogs.

    I think that belonging to a group of people that share your interest can add so much enjoyment to what you do. I used to belong to a group of knitters that met at Liberty in London - a 'knitting guild' of sorts. Our weekly meetings were so much fun and full of laughter - we were all different people, but our passion brought us together - that's what I would hope for from a modern quilt guild as well.

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  51. 1. Modern, I think. Black, red and brown DO NOT belong together!!

    2. Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild? ~ NO ~

    3. N/A

    4. If not, why not? ~ The traditional quilt guild is filled with retired women who are available week days when I am typically at work.

    5. What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds? ~ I haven't got a clue really.

    6. Do you belong to a modern quilt guild? ~ Yes, just joined but cannot attend meetings in person because it's too far away.

    7. If yes, what as been your experience in the guild?

    8. If not, why not?

    9. What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds? ~ Younger members, eclectic, new and exciting ideas.

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  52. I love both traditional quilting and the brighter, less ordered look of the so called 'modern' quilts....I don't understand why there has to be a divide. As a longarm quilter I see all manner of quilts which require very different treatments...sometimes the batik one or sludge purple one make me want to give it up!!! but it is not my place to judge preferences, so I have learned to be accepting of all creations!! It seems that 'modern' assumes that the quilter is young and 'traditional' means old and grey (or over 30 !!!!).....and the result becomes yet another 'clique". I am a member of a friendship group who meet once a month....we all do completely different things and are the richer for it. Try bright, grey wonky, reproduction, solids et al....a change is as good as a rest!! Incidentally, I am not a member of a guild....I find large groups of women rather intimidating!

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  53. More modern than trad and would love to belong to something real as opposed to virtual but can`t for geographical reasons!

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  54. I guess I would call myself "modern" because of my colour choices and because I love brights. Also I am computer literate, so I read lots of blogs. Having said that, I am using these fabrics in some very traditional blocks like Mariner's Star, and really enjoying myself. There are lots of skills to be learned, and many so-called modern blocks are a take on a traditional block. I meet once a week with a great group of women of all ages, they are wonderfully friendly and supportive, and we all do our own projects. I recently went to a meeting that was for a more structured guild, and didn't find it terribly friendly, but it may improve. I'll give it a years trial. I think we all have something to offer in quilting, and there's room for lots of different styles and tastes without bothering to label ourselves.

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  55. when my babies are a little older, I'll likely join a traditional quilt guild (it's 45 minutes away though)... there aren't any modern ones near us! I'm fine with traditional, as long as they're willing to be a little open minded with me too! :)

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  56. 1. Would you class yourself more as a traditional quilter or a modern quilter (or somewhere in between or a mixture of both)?
    If we don't spend a heap of time clarifying what we mean by 'modern' and 'traditional' I guess I would say that I use modern fabric and make a lot of traditional designs or use traditional techniques (repeating blocks, EPP at times, less improv and hand quilting, with perle cotton so I guess it isn't quite what the traditionalists would accept)

    2. Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild?
    No

    3. If yes, what has been your experience in the guild?
    4. If not, why not?
    I have heard from friends who have it that the meetings are more formal meetings and less about sewing.

    5. What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds?
    I get the impression they are more formal, political and less about actually sewing and sharing and enjoying the process together.

    6. Do you belong to a modern quilt guild?
    Yes

    7. If yes, what as been your experience in the guild?
    I have had fun, and made some good friends. I joined soon after I had moved to a new city and have been able to make friends, share something I love doing with people face to face for the first time. I guess the focus I have found is on the doing and sharing which I have seen does not happen at the more traditional guilds.

    8. If not, why not?

    9. What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds?
    That they seem to be more accepting of a range of skills levels and styles (including some that I would consider traditional) and also cater to a wider group of people (men, younger people as 'normal' quilters rather than an exception)

    10. Is there anything else you would like to add?
    It kind of seems to me that a lot of the time (and maybe it is only in my own mind) that the generation gap is included in the traditional/modern labels. Sure there are many older quilters that would define themselves and 'modern', many younger that do more 'traditional' work but when I am lectured like a naughty schoolgirl, my opinions and comments dismissed or I'm spoken to as if I know nothing by an older traditional quilter it really doesn't make me feel valued or accepted as a fellow quilter and leads me to view the 'traditional' guilds in a similar light, especially when I am interacting with them in their capacity as a member or office bearer of one of these guilds.

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    Replies
    1. I also find that generally modern quilt guilds have more opportunity to participate online and in person in the evening and on the weekend s which is the only time I have, working full-time, and differs from my impression of traditional guilds and even classes and meet-ups in many stores.

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  57. I've only been quilting for a year or so. Once I started reading the blogs, the "modern" aspect appealed to me - I remembered the traditional quilting of the 70's, and that wasn't so appealing. Our Sacramento Modern Quilt Guild is a couple of years old but we're just starting to collect dues and think about speakers. We're had members do some demonstrations. The biggest objection I hear to the traditional guilds is the time they meet (days), too much "business" at the meetings, and the dreaded "quilt police". I listened to a traditional meeting the other day while I was in a quilt shop and was appalled at the attitudes. Our guild has members from 25 to over 75 and we enjoy each other's work and encourage whatever people are doing. Many people in our guild have day jobs. I'm thinking thast some of the "traditional" guilds have just gotten frozen in place, that they want new members to fit in with them rather than accepting people as they are - and they don't realize that they need more flexibility.

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  58. Hi, I would consider myself a mix now given I have been experimenting with all kinds of quilting techniques and approaches. I belong to three quilt guilds. Two are in person - they have both been positive experiences and have different cultures. The third is an on-line community. Of the two local guilds, one is more intimate (smaller number of members) while the other is more than double the size. I have enjoyed the programmes of both guilds as I like seeing the different styles and approaches and there is always something to be learned. For me, the joys of participating in guilds/on-line communities is the fellowship and willingness to share information regardless of what style of quilting one does.

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  59. I'm a bit of a mix. I started more in the traditional line, but I've moved towards modern fabrics and modern patterns these days. Part of my 'journey' towards becoming a quilter involved joining a local quilting group.

    It's not a "guild", though - just a group of quilters who meet once a month to chat, have lunch, sew, and get away from the responsibilities of our families one weekend a month. The women in it are mostly older (maybe 75% would be over 60, and 90% over 40), but they're open to anyone who wants to sit and quilt.

    Actually, the impression I've received speaking to the quilting group is that the "traditional guild" mostly sneers at them for not being pure enough. But that's just an impression; I could be wrong.

    A friend of mine has just started running a modern quilt guild in our city, specifically with the intent of attracting more 'under 40s' who quilt. We haven't quite gotten it off the ground as yet, but we're hoping to start regular meetings next month, along with challenges, inspiration posts, and suchlike.

    Much as I love the quilting group, sometimes it's nice to chat with people in your own age bracket - to be able to make the 'in joke' references of your time and age group, instead of having to explain it all. I'm hoping that the development of a local MQG brings a few younger quilters out of the woodwork.

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  60. Definitely a modern quilter - I care much more about fabric, colour and design than about intricate piecing for the sake of piecing. And all my knowledge/enthusiasm is from learning quilting by reading blogs. Like this one ;)

    I thought about joining the local quilt guild at the start of the year - went along to a fabric sale they were having, and felt welcomed but a bit out of place, due to being the youngest by at least ~10 yrs. Also odd being in an all-women space. But partway through the year they started a modern quilting group, which meets at a weeknight time I can get to, and that was very fun: all were enthusiastic about 'modern' quilting even if not sure entirely what it was, and there was enjoyable, non-eviscerating show-and-tell. The modern group meets once a month; haven't been back yet because I wanted to have a finished project to take, but I will.

    About the only part of interacting with the guild which I found odd/establishment-oriented was that the new group wanted to have a modern quilts room at the annual guild show: but to enter in the show, you had to have been a paid-up member of the guild, by six months earlier. That I found really discouraging.

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  61. Hi Lynne,

    Just thought I would add my pennies worth. I belong to several patchwork groups but not to our local guild, for no reason other than i keep forgetting that it is on until someone reminds me after the event but that is an aside. The only problem I see with modern quilting is the word modern itself. Everything has its roots in traditional methods because without it you cannot break the rules and experiment. I think of anything else other than real traditional as art quilts and I like a mixture of things. There are a lot of traditional quilts I don't like and there are some stunning "modern" quilts I like so I don't asign myself firmly to any camp. If I like it, I like it. Everything also has its day and I have been around fabric for a long time now to know that what is in fashion now soon becomes obsolete and colour tastes and trends change. What I do know is that we should all respect that we have different tastes and though we might not like what somone else is doing it doesn't give us the right to slate it as rubbish, it is just different and that person will have spent just as much time and energy making it. It is what makes this subject so fascinating. It has been around a long time and will continue to do so now that a younger generation have become involved, just remember that you cannot have one without having had the other first. Just enjoy what you do however you choose to do it. I notice some saying about the business side of groups and committees, they are a necessary evil or it is chaos at such events without it. Just have to be patient with such matters. Keep your mind open to all ideas and then it won't become set and stale. Everything has been done before, it just comes back under a new label and with fresher fabrics. You are doing a sterling job promoting the craft because that what it is - a craft and there is some fabulous work being made. Well done to you.

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  62. I would love to belong to any group! Down here in Cornwall, all the groups I know of meet during the day which excludes those who, like me, have to work to support their fabric addiction!, so, if anyone knows of anything near Truro - please let me know.
    Modern/traditional - I like both but probably tend to make traditional patterns with modern fabrics.
    Mal

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  63. I would love to belong to any group! Down here in Cornwall, all the groups I know of meet during the day which excludes those who, like me, have to work to support their fabric addiction!, so, if anyone knows of anything near Truro - please let me know.
    Modern/traditional - I like both but probably tend to make traditional patterns with modern fabrics.
    Mal

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  64. Hi Lynne
    I've been thinking about your questions and thought I'd throw in my tuppence worth. I started quilting in the 70's and gave it up because I could'nt find any fabrics I liked with the exception then of Laura Ashley, but of course that was a particular nostalgic look. I would class myself as a mixture of trad and modern, as at the end of the day the process is the same, it's just how you execute it and what fabrics you use.You only have to look at say Farmer's wife quilts in modern fabrics to see how fabulous traditional designs can look. The solid Amish quilts ( not the stuff they churn out now for tourists)are works of art that shine out in the flesh and they have been around a long time.
    I do not belong to a traditional guild group even though there are 2 in my local area and another only 30 mins away. This is because one has a waiting list to join, and is very snotty and the other meets in the day so only those who are unemployed or retired can attend.I have also seen their work and although beautifully executed it is not at all to my taste. I don't think age matters although here too most of the members are elderly, it depends on whether you are open to new ideas.In the local shows which are run by the WI(quite often in rural areas like my own the members overlap) the entries and the prize winning pieces are all incredibly traditional and to my taste, terribly dull but made with great skill.
    Unfortunately, there is no Modern Guild in my area so I get my encouragement and support from my Stitch and Bitch group. This is primarily a knitting group but has a great age range and some wonderfully innovative women. These are very informal meetings with a lot of wine and a lot of laughter.This is what I imagine a Modern Quilting Guild would be like. However, the other knitter's have no interest in patchwork or quilting so I have to get my quilting inspiration from blogland.
    I think ,as someone else has mentioned, that the only way to get modern quilts seen, is to enter them into shows and then they can be shown next to more traditional offerings.I am constantly surprised by how many talented, mostly women, are out there. Long may it continue.

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  65. I have been to classes at my local quilt shop and it's all very beige. All the ladies are my mother's age and certainly love the traditional type of quilts.
    I have been to the quilt show from my local guild and again very beige or arty wall hangings.
    I don't think I am quite ready for beige and brown yet. I would love to meet some quilters in my age range though.

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  66. I don't belong to any kind of quilt guild. I guess I've not looked into what's available in my area. I have an impression that TQG would be full of old ladies using browns, beiges and making a lot of quilts like I see in displays where the workmanship is technically great but either lacks imagination and or using really horrible fabrics. I guess I'm also a bit put off that quilt guilds (especially in this part of the country) would be very cliquey and snooty - quilt police in twin set and pearls. I would love to be in a guild/club like some of the modern quilt guilds that have been set up largely by groups of bloggers and are as much about meeting up with a group of friends as anything else.

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  67. I tried to join the local Patchwork group in the local village, but they wouldn't have me as they didn't like my liberated style. I then started blogging and found my perfect "guild" through other like minded quilters. I then formed my own online guild - the Liberated Quilters Yahoo Group - and have found my home. We do fabric swaps, our own Round Robins where we work on our own quilts from instructions posted to the group once a month and have a virtual retreat every few months when we post recipes and our progress throughout the week.

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  68. Wow - big question, lots of answers.
    I think "modern" quilting is about doing something in a new way, with new fabrics and new ideas. It's not about ditching the old traditional methods, although the old brown and beige batiks are definitely not modern in my view.

    I'm not a member of a guild, mainly because there are virtually no modern quilters here. I don't know I'd join a formal group (been there in a former crafty life, can't do with the politics!) but I love to have a group of friends that met from time to time for chatting, sewing, charing ideas. I have recently been in contact with one lady who lives not too far away, and we are going to meet up next month. Who knows what may come from it!

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  69. Yes, I'm a mixture of traditional and more modern, but on the traditional end of things. I do belong to a guild. I joined one that I found to be very non-political. They don't spend a ton of time on business,more on fun.
    I love being in a big room with other quilters. It was very important for me to find the right guild, most just didn't appeal because they felt less about quilting and more about politics. I just love mine, it is called Stray Threads and is in Woodinville, Washington.

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  70. I guess I'm between a modern and tradional quilter - I like traditional blocks but love bright & fresh colours, scrappy quilts and white as a contrast. I'm not afraid of wonky things, but like to push myself & produce pointy points and precise piecing!

    Your post prompted me to google local quilting groups and as I suspected they seem to be daytime groups for ladies of a certain age - no good for working Mums! I did however find a blog for a local modern online group, so thanks for the shove!

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  71. one thing I want to say is that I don't belong to our local guild anymore because it was dominated by people 30 years older than me with ideas that are about that old too. Now that said - it cracks me up that "modern" quilting isn't considered traditional. Of course its traditional - just with a simpler ascetic. So I would think that modern quilters would fit in better with traditional quilters rather than the art quilters. Seems to be there is a US vs THEM relationship. Sighhhhhhh I would love to belong to a guild that is dominated by those under 50.

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  72. I already posted a comment earlier, but I'm back to add one more thing! I am noticing that many commenters are making age a factor in whether or not they join a guild or not. I just wanted to say that age in and of itself is not the dividing line between modern and traditional. I am nearly 52 years old...and I very much fall in line with the modern quilt movement. I love improv, bright colors, solids, collaborative efforts...I am not a rule follower and I often do not follow patterns as written (or I design my own quilts). I also do not feel like I would fit in the traditional guilt in my area even though I am certain there are women close to my age there. I would just implore everyone to avoid the trap of ageism - what we like and dislike does not have as much to do with age as it has to do with our own style sense and ability to keep an open mind!!!

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  73. I am fairly new, only have one completed quilt (have many others in various states).
    I consider myself a mix leaning towards modern (but never primitive/country). I do not belong to any group/meet/guild. I'm pretty much on my own. I only go to the one quilt store (in area that I like) to purchase fabric. The store is more trad or "cute".
    I may want to meet with others but just never taken the time to see if there is anyone around.
    ~Ann in Baltimore

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  74. Hi! I don't belong to any guild even would love to. There are none here and so few quilters in Greece. The second best is to have wonderful quilter friends around the world through blogging!

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  75. I would classify myself as a mix between modern and traditional quilter. I love traditional blocks and patterns, but I do them up in bright colours. I like the modern fabrics that are out, but I can see the appeal of the more classical colour schemes too. I think that the main difference between modern and traditional quilting is the colour and fabric choices. I've seen quilts from the 1870s all the way to the 1930s that just scream today's modern to me.

    I belong to a traditional guild, and I'm quite involved in it. I am the youngest member, but there is another member who is just a few months older than me, and just last month, another younger member joined as well. Other than that, it is mostly older women. We meet in the evening, once a month. They try to keep the business meeting as short as possible, to about 5 minutes, and the rest of the time is devoted to demos and speakers and showing off our latest creations. My taste is definitely not that of everyone else's, but I've never got anything but loads of positive comments on my work. It is a very postive, upbuilding environment.

    I am not a member of a modern guild, only because there are none in our area. I have no time to start one myself, and the nearest is two and a half hours away. I would join if there was a local one. I do have a few local friends who dabble in quilting, but they're as busy as me, so we don't often have time to meet together to sew.

    I think it's important to learn the history of the craft, and I get that from the older quilters, but I also love the enthusiasm and energy of the newer, younger quilters. Blogging has opened new worlds for me too, and I love that I've been exposed to things I never would have seen before.

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  76. Traditional as far as pattern and design, modern by fabric and colour choice. I would love to be able to say modern in every way but due to my inexperience I am inbetween.

    I would love to join a guild if I knew how to find one (either modern or traditional.

    Janette

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  77. 1. More modern
    2. No
    4. I heard there were some guilds in my city and I gave my email address to some people running a quilt show, but never heard anything. It sounded like they were significantly older than me...maybe they don't have email? I'm not sure the times were going to work for me anyway. I couldn't find any info online.
    6. No
    8. The closest one is about an hour away, which is farther than I want to drive.
    10. I'd like to try a guild, but at the same time have found a lot of friends on line.

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  78. 1) I like both, but definitely lean toward modern
    2) 2 guilds - one is large, one is small - both are traditional. They are the only guilds nearby (45 min one way).
    3) I learn and am inspired by the other quilters, but often feel uncomfortable showing my more modern quilts - not much enthusiasm greets "Show and Tell".
    6) I'd love to join a modern quilt guild if there was one close
    8) Distance is a problem - 2+ hours to the closest one (one way)

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  79. I like traditional patterns with modern fabrics. I joined a traditional guild a few years ago and was disappointed in the experience. Some of the responsibility for that lies with me, of course. I only attended one meeting and didn't give the group another chance. I just felt very unwelcome and there was a strong "this is how WE do things." To be fair, it was THEIR guild. I've been involved in a couple of modern quilt guilds, all in their infancy. The first had some great people, but it tried to include too large an area and everyone had to travel an hour or more for the meetings. Few people wanted to make that commitment. It eventually split into two groups, the closer of which quickly went dormant. A couple of friends and I started one closer to home, but haven't had a lot of success with that, either. We tried to meet monthly, but many people were interested in participating online, not so much in person. As one of the founders, I felt like no one wanted to step up and take an active role in organizing the group. I wan't doing the job very well, either. We've let that group slide, although the website is still active. At some point we hope to revive it.

    Honestly, the most fun quilting group I belong to is an informal group of women who get together once a month and spend the day sewing and laughing. We range in age from 25-ish to 65-ish. Our styles range from modern to ultra-traditional. We have people who have been quilting for just a few months and some who have been quilting for more than 25 years. We are constantly learning from one another and can all appreciate the quilts the other women create, even if they aren't something we'd make ourselves.

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  80. I consider myself somewhere between traditional and modern. But not an art quilter. I joined our local guild around 5 yrs ago to meet other talented crafty women. It's been great even if I'm one of the young ones at 50!!! The women are inspiring and supportive and definitely not te quilt police. It's been fun.

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  81. good questions Lynne! I mix trad and modern, like most of us here ...

    18 months ago, when I met with them at a show, I was asked to write an article about Modern Quilting and the rise of internet quilting groups for the Quilters' Guild of the British Isles ... Unfortunately they wanted me to join the Guild before I wrote the article! I thought that £40 was a bit steep, and a bit cheeky frankly. I know they do wonderful things for the preservation of quilts and all that, but I just don't feel I fit.

    I don't belong to a traditional guild - when I was doing my Bletchley Quilt I had a lot of interaction with a local (to Bletchley)chapter of the Quilters' Guild of The British Isles and quite frankly, the grandes dames were terrifying.

    Quilt Police? More like Quilt Stasi. They were cliquey (ooh what a surprise, the Guild leader won the raffle) and really really really unwelcoming. I'm not a difficult person to get along with and can usually chameleon myself to fit in to strange places. I came home feeling like a total unworthy outsider, ready to hang up my seam ripper for good.

    The members themselves were interesting and really wanted to chat about and show what they were doing - a lot of creativity - and modern quilting was definitely creeping in - along with the more traditional mass of batik and 70s type 'art quilts'.

    However, these 'modern' practices were most definitely frowned upon. "That's not the way WE do it here ... Solids? Really? Oh no, dear!"

    This is one typical conversation:

    QGLady (sneeringly): "You should join the Contemporary Group"

    Me: "That sounds very interesting, how do I go about doing that?"

    QGLady: "Oh, you need to be invited."

    Me: "How does that work then?"

    QGLady: "You have to know someone".

    Me (looking at the name badge): "Ah, ok, well Ms X, nice to meet you! Now we know each other, don't we?"

    QGLady (shock and horror barely concealed): "Oh it doesn't work like that. And we've already had to let a few go because they didn't really fit, if you know what I mean."

    Yes. I know what they meant.

    We had to whisper in corners - fitting for Bletchley, but not really conducive to creativity. I was volunteering at the exhibition, so I had two days to chat in hushed tones.

    I've joined the London Modern Quilt Guild, but realistically, I don't get up to Lunnun enough to visit friends, it's not going to be the solution. As my health is not so good, I can't commit to being up to travelling on the day.

    The good news is that a Brighton Modern Quilt Guild is starting up - woohoo! I'm up for that. Anyone interested can email me and I'll pass deets on ...

    I think the other major reason why trad guilds are not for me are that they are predominantly for retired people, so the meetings simply don't fit in to my working day. I can't get to a meeting that starts at 5pm and locally it's at least a 50 min journey to where the Sussex Guild meets.

    I'm 50 next year but I'm a spring chicken as far as my quilty brain is concerned. Age and 'Modern-ness' is NOT the issue here.

    A welcoming attitude and openness to new ideas are the key. Traditional and and Modern should co-exist. That's the only way we can learn - These grandes dames have such amazing knowledge to share ... This is what is missing from the Quilt Guilds in my experience, but if we want that to change I think we need to be part of it. Tricky one.

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  82. I'm not sure what I classify myself as... I'm a quilter who loves to piece together tops and dislikes quilting. :)
    I belong to guild because I think its important to have quilting friends in the flesh as well as cyberspace. It is tradtional because their meetings fit my schedule. Although the monthly speakers/classes cover a wide variety of fiber artistry quilting techniques. example painting fabric and printing photos on fabric to EPP and precut patterns.

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  83. 1. Would you class yourself more as a traditional quilter or a modern quilter (or somewhere in between or a mixture of both)?
    I would class myself as a modern quilter. I don't like the old fashioned prints at all.

    2. Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild?
    No. I looked at joining the traditional Quilt Guild last year but never did join, although I'm sure the members are more my age than the members of the LMQG.

    3. If yes, what has been your experience in the guild?

    4. If not, why not?
    Just didn't seem to be what I wanted.

    5. What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds?
    That the members were as old as me but quite fuddy duddy in their ideas of quilts and quilting and they wouldn't use plain fabrics which I love or the modern fabrics which I also love.

    6. Do you belong to a modern quilt guild?
    Yes I do. I belong to the LMQG

    7. If yes, what as been your experience in the guild?
    It's been really nice but I feel really old as I am by far the oldest person that belongs.

    8. If not, why not?

    9. What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds?
    It is just what I wanted but I wish I wasn't so old. All the members are so much younger than I am with young children whilst I have young(ish) grandchildren. They don't mean to make me feel old - I just do.

    10. Is there anything else you would like to add?
    No. They make me feel really welcome but I still feel really old.

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  84. 1. I would say a mixture of both. Modern fabrics and colors excite and inspire me, but traditional quilts are very often a source of inspiration, a starting point.
    2.Yes I do - for a long time now and I just love it.
    3. I had and have a great experience in my guild! It is one of the oldest and larges in the city but a great mix of traditional and very avantguard quilters and everything in between!
    5. That is a hard one...I guess some can be a bit un-comfortable for newbies, maybe even judgmental and that is really too bad. My experience is nothing like that, so it's safe to say - guilds should be given a chance and see for yourself.
    6. No, not yet - just didn't find one around me. But I do belong to a MQG Facebook group and I just love the conversations, sharing and all.
    9. I think they are great and the fact that they attract and encourage a lot of young, new quilters is just wonderful!
    10. Thanks for asking all these questions - reading all the answers was just great!

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  85. I love both modern and traditional quilts and techniques and really want to mix between the two. Did used to go to the local quilt group - which meets five minutes walk away from my house but found most of them were into things I was not and not really welcoming to me! Found a friend there and we continued meeting outside the group. Went back recently but am being lured into the London Modern Quilt Guild by Charlotte even though it is miles away...worth the trek though as it is more my thing!

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  86. 1. Would you class yourself more as a traditional quilter or a modern quilter (or somewhere in between or a mixture of both)?
    I am a mix of both, Love traditional blocks with a modern twist

    2. Do you belong to a traditional quilt guild?
    No they meet on a monday night and I have other commitments, but I would join if I could maybe!

    3. If yes, what has been your experience in the guild?

    4. If not, why not?
    see answer above

    5. What impression do you have of traditional quilt guilds?
    My local guild puts on a great show each year but the age of most of the members is 60+ and make very traditional quilts

    6. Do you belong to a modern quilt guild?
    yes Wollongong Modern Quilt Guild NSW Australia and a new group Great Western Sydney MQG

    7. If yes, what as been your experience in the guild?
    very positive and a great group of ladies ranging in age from 16 to 60+

    8. If not, why not?

    9. What impression do you have of modern quilt guilds?
    they are more open to change, difference in quilting styles and accepting of all

    10. Is there anything else you would like to add?
    I think that there is the place for both groups but I like that my dd1 who is 32 can come with her mum to a mqg and we are both accepted as equals

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  87. Interesting post - I'm really enjoying reading the answers here. Belonging to a guild is a matter I have been giving a lot of thought to recently, and I ended up leaving the one I had been a member to for ten years. I started out making traditional quilts, taking classes and learning the basic skills. Very soon I found myself wanting to put a personal twist on things. I have belonged to an online group for much longer than I belonged to the guild, and found that it gave me lots more inspiration, something I could never get my local guild to understand. With the advent of blogs, Flickr and Pinterest, modern quilting and early access to new fabric lines, I find that I have veered off in a different direction from my fellow guild members.
    Finding myself continually having to explain my fabric and design preferences, as if there was something wrong with them, while most members were busy making quilts and table runners from the same kits, and themes for meetings falling back on how to make various traditional blocks, while all my suggestions of challenging ourselves to learn new things kept falling to the ground, made me leave. I like the company of other quilters though, so I am thinking of starting a small group of like minded people to get together to stitch and chat and share inspiration.

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  88. It seems im not alone in my experience. Im not a member of a traditional guild. I tried to join but they said they were full(!). I put my name down on a waiting list but ive never made it to the top (aparantly it 'helps' if you know someone who already attends! I have 3 young kids and couldnt make any daytime classes they ran. In the end i started my own club called MakeClub which consisted of other young mums, interestingly over the 3 years we have been meeting we now have gathered quite a lot of older women with a modern aesthetic. My experience is that modern doesnt automatically mean young! My mums generation ( in their sixties) have the same taste to me and my friends, the local quilt guid age profile was probably older than my mums friends but im not sure age is the issue, its more state of mind!

    I have found quilting with like minded people so valuable and enriching. My MakeClub experience has been 100% fab, i do think a critical part of quilting is the communal aspect. I love the online quilt wold but its not a total substitute to real life people/ quilt contact ( less cake?!) i would love to join a modern guild but london is my nearest but i cant get there with young kids so maybe in the future? Id love a modern Chilterns Guild!

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  89. I am a mixture of both traditional and modern.

    I belong to a traditional quilter's guild.

    I've been asking myself why I am with this group, meetings are boring and it always seems someone is unwilling to do the block of the month.

    Probably my biggest pet peave,because someone has taken the time to cut and prepare the blocks and just because someone doesn't like the block they wont even try it! If you don't like it do not put your name in the drawing.

    I have asked long standing members what the group does and the answer is usually service quilt project. The feeling of satisfaction. I give quilts away as gifts and sometimes just because and personally I do not need a group to do that.

    I've asked about topics of the month..and members just say well most people already know how to do that.

    We don't even get taught all but 4 times a year and that cost anywhere from 30.00 to 40.00 depending on the teacher.

    A modern guild would be awesome..too bad their isn't any here. Great on-line sites.

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  90. I like both traditional and modern quilting. Learning something new adds to the person you are and opens up your mind to try other things.
    The quilt guild I belong to is traditional. The members are very welcoming. We have quilt challenges, block of the month, speakers, charity quilts, endowment, potlucks, a retreat twice a year and a wonderful quilt show once a year...and more. Together we learn from each other about quilting and life... the community of quilters is a great place to make new friends with similar interests.
    There is a Modern Quilt guild nearby. I have not joined yet because I just found out about it. So I have to visit and see what happens.
    My opinion is that there is so much to we can gain from both while we continue to pass along our love for quilting for generations to come.

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  91. I belong to a traditional quilt Guild and I like making a mix of trad and modern quilts. I've found my guild to be welcoming and friendly but, as with most large organisations, there will always be a mix of people, some more friendly than others. What I can't understand about MQG is why they need to be a separate group as they seem to make the same type of quilts as most of the people at my guild. It seems a shame to have a 'them and us' situation when we have so much we could share. I suppose that the business/committee side of the traditional guilds can be a bore but are a necessary evil as a group grows in size (legal requirements/insurance cover.
    etc)
    So, I think there is room for both types of guilds but would wish that they could work together rather than in opposition.

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