Sunday, 20 February 2011

Trying a new technique

Before I start this post, Marjorie has today written the second of her posts on back-basting needle turn applique and the link is here if you want to learn along with me.

When I saw this stunning quilt in the doll quilt swap over on Flickr, I bought the book and decided to give the technique a try.  Lucinda had asked for a block representing "spring" in one of the bees I'm in, Ringo Pie.  I found a picture on line of a daffodil head, started from there and drew a daffodil complete with stalk and leaves and then added in broken bits to give the impression of a stained glass window.

Spring Ringo Pie block for Lucinda

Once I had the drawing on paper, I re-drew it so that each line was approximately 1/4" wide.  I then traced each shape onto Steam-a-seam and fused each piece of fabric onto a 10" square of  Kona charcoal.  I need to decide how to finish the block now.  My options are (i) straight line or blanket stitching in invisible thread; (ii) the same in yellow, green and grey thread; (ii) the same in charcoal thread.  And thoughts anyone?  

And can I just make one suggestion to any of you who comment on blogs but wonder why you never get any replies to your comments.  I reply to (almost) all comments although I don't try to keep up with comments on a giveaway.  But I have noticed, particularly in the last few weeks, more and more comments that I can't reply to because there is no linked email account.  These come up on my screen as "no reply comment blogger".  So, if you have a blogger account and would like to receive replies to your comments on blogger blogs, you need to edit your profile and here is how you do it:
1. Click "Design" in the top right hand corner of your blog.
2, Click "Dashboard" in the top right hand corner of the screen.
3. Click "Edit Profile"which is next to your icon.
4. In the "privacy" section, make sure that you have ticked the box marked "show my email address".
5. In the "Identity" section, make sure you have your email address listed there.  If you are concerned about privacy, you can always create a new email address just for blogging.
6. Click "save profile" at the bottom of the screen and hopefully you will start getting replies to some of your comments.

24 comments:

  1. My vote is for option 1 or 2 for the threads and straight line stitching!
    It looks great!

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  2. It's a beautiful block Lynne! As is the original inspiration! I would do a little sample and try each technique, I'd want to see what straight line in matching/invisible thread looks like against doing it with a small blanket stitch in a charcoal to match the background. It will also help see how the fabrics behave with the different stitches and tensions. I hope that helps :)

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  3. that is so lovely! I agree with Trudi - try them out first and see what you prefer the look of/what works best.

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  5. Yep - go with what they say - I think the stained glass effect looks terrific!

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  6. Wow! This turns out beautifully! Thanks for linking my work to your post. I've finishing quilting my tile quilt and am in the binding stage. What I did on my was raw edge applique with matching or variegated thread. Before I applique, I did iron on stablizer first on the back of the background fabric to prevent shrinkage.

    Cheers!

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  8. This is sooopah doopah Lynne - love the stained glass - I think I'd go charcoal or invisible - but then I'm a bit of an applique newbie so don't listen to what I have to say - am currently effin and blinding over the gazillions of little leaves I have to do on one of my swap pieces ;)

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  9. The stained glass effect is stunning. I think I would go with invisible thread. Lovely.

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  10. I love this stained glass effect! I did a Baltimore album quilt years ago and it used a good deal of Reverse Applique - which was a lot of fun to do. But this stained glass technique allows you to use more color. I love it!

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  11. wonderful design! i would test options 2 and 3 with a blanket stitch. but then, i like to see stitches!

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  12. i think straight line in matching colors

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  13. I am off to order the book now, inspired by both this and your inspiration quilt. I would make a couple of smaller bits and test out all your ideas to see which is the one you like the best. I also agree with the use of a stabilizer on the back to prevent uneven shrinking. It is going to be beautiful.

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  14. Buttercups are my very favorite flower and I love your quilt. Beautiful:)

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  15. I go with straight line stitching - sometimes the blanket stitching can be TOO heavy and distract from the overall effect - so it's option 1 for me - OH and why don't you try something similar as a NTA tester project, practice before the quilt along ;0)

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  16. The effect is lovely! I agree with the straight line idea, blanket stitch is too obvious I think. Very pretty!

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  17. I love that you just get right onto things. This is looking awesome so far and I just know it'll keep getting better. I'm not a huge fan of invisible thread, that's just me, I think it's too plasticy. I pick a straight stitch in yellow green and grey.

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  18. Blimey, you're cranking it up a notch now. It's beautiful.

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  19. I wouldn't use it with a baby quilt, but for a wall hanging, I'd go with the invisible in a small blanket stitch - I've done that it it is very close to invisible.

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  20. An art deco daffodil. Be still my heart. LOVE the bent stem - that design feature totally makes this composition for me, Lynne. It's the bomb.

    Because the lines are relatively straight and smooth, I would be inclined to use a small straight stitch with matching threads with my sewing foot on, not free-motioned. I do like several others' idea of doing some practice trying different thread colours. Can't wait to see the results! If you do some variations, hope you'll show us!

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  21. I love this! I don't have any tips about thread color, other than that most anything would look great! :)

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  22. Thank you so much for sending us to the back basting tutorials. I was given some vintage wedding ring quilt blocks (not actually blocks, just the little segments all stitched to each other) that my mother in law has kept for more than 60 years. The little segments aren't cut very consistently, and vary quite a lot in size and shape. MIL wants me to make something with them, but trying to piece the blocks is out of the question; I have thought all along applique will be the way to go, but have been stumped about exactly how to do it. The back basting method is exactly what I needed! I'm eager to use this method and FINALLY make something with the heirloom pieces.

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  23. just so lovely!
    thank you for sharing your creativity!

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